Plantar Fasciitis Treatment

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      What is Plantar Fasciitis?     |     Symptoms     |     Causes     |     Diagnosing

      Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis

      In general, plantar fasciitis is a self-limiting condition. Unfortunately, the time until resolution is often six to 18 months, which can lead to frustration for patients and physicians. Rest was cited by 25 percent of patients with plantar fasciitis in one study as the treatment that worked best. Athletes, active adults and persons whose occupations require lots of walking may not be compliant if instructed to stop all activity. Many sports medicine physicians have found that outlining a plan of “relative rest” that substitutes alternative forms of activity for activities that aggravate the symptoms will increase the chance of compliance with the treatment plan.

      It is equally important to correct the problems that place individuals at risk for plantar fasciitis, such as increased amount of weight-bearing activity, increased intensity of activity, hard walking/running surfaces and worn shoes. Early recognition and treatment usually lead to a shorter course of treatment as well as increased probability of success with conservative treatment measures.

      There are a few options your doctor could try to ease your pain and reduce inflammation in your foot. Your doctor might even recommend you try a few therapies at the same time. These include:

      Medication . Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) will help with your pain and reduce inflammation of the plantar fascia. Your doctor may prescribe multiple doses a day for several weeks.

      Steroid injection. If your pain is severe or doesn't respond to prescribed NSAIDs, you might want to think about getting a steroid injection.

      The steroid is injected into the most painful part of your plantar fascia. It may help ease your pain for about a month, But it will keep the inflammation down for even longer than that.

      Physical therapy. If medication, rest, and ice don't help enough, your doctor might recommend that you go to a physical therapist. 

      You'll learn exercises to stretch and strengthen your plantar fascia, Achilles tendon, and lower leg muscles. Your physical therapist may also use massage, contrast baths, or ultrasonography to help with long-term healing.

      If you don't show progress after several months, your doctor may recommend a more involved procedure or even surgery.

      Information from https://www.webmd.com/


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